BALKAN SYNDROMЕ?

The rivers in the Bulgarian cities often face the same problem - they are not integrated enough in the urban fabric and are not being utilized (not to mention that they are sometimes polluted). Is this the case in other Balkan cities too? This is what the researchers, planners and activists from several Balkan cities debate on.

Where: Stage at Maritsa

When: 20.09; 15.00-17.00

Language: English, no translation

 


LJUBICA SLAVKOVIC (Belgrade)

There is not one but two rivers that run through Belgrade - the Sava River and the Danube. Ljubica Slavkovic is an architect and a researcher who has a weak spot for non-formal learning and active citizenship. She will tell us about the role of rivers in contemporary Belgrade.

Supported by the European Cultural Foundation




ARMINA PILAV (Sarajevo)

 Armina Pilav, a feminist, visual urbanist and city explorer with a PhD from IUAV University of Venice, will talk about how a contested and fragmented city like Sarajevo is coping with the contemporary urban transformations.

Supported by the European Cultural Foundation

 


ELVAN DAJKO, ANTONIO DI RAIMO (Tirana)

 Elvan Dajko and Antonio di Raimo will  talk about the new projects that have reconfigured the island in the heart of the town of Berat – a UNESCO World Heritage Site – as well as the activities involved around the Tirana River, which also runs through the country’s capital city.



MARTA ILIEVSKA, OLIVER ILIEVSKI (Skopje)

 Macedonian architects Marta Ilievska and Oliver Ilievski present their research on the relationship between the Vardar River and Skopje. The project consists of an analysis of the river as a border, a historical overview of the construction along the banks as well as suggestions and examples of full life around the river.

Supported by the European Cultural Foundation

 



CLAUDIU FORGACI (Bucharest)

 Claudiu Forgaci is a Romanian architect and urbanist with a keen interest in urban spatial structure, large rivers and the integration of waterways as central infrastructures that have an important social role. He sharеs his experience gained from his research on the Dâmbovița River in Bucharest.

Claudiu Forgaci has a degree in Architecture from Bucharest. He has studied in Venice and the Netherlands, and is currently a PhD student at the Department of Urbanism at Delft University of Technology.

Supported by the Romanian Cultural Institute

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